Ahmanson Undergraduate Research Scholarships

Up to ten undergraduate scholarships are offered every year to support undergraduate student research at the Clark Library. These are intended for UCLA upper-division students who enroll in a designated course (usually open to upper division students from any UCLA department). Program details, seminar descriptions and requirements, and application procedures are announced each year.

2017–18 Ahmanson Undergraduate Seminars
Pope Alexander Satirical print, 1729.

English 182C.2: Savage Indignation: Satire, Anger, and Misanthropy in the Eighteenth Century
Directed by Professor Helen Deutsch, UCLA Department of English,
 hdeutsch@humnet.ucla.edu
Winter Quarter 2018, Wednesdays 1:00–4:00 p.m.
Held at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library (off campus)
The Clark Library is located 12 miles from campus in the West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles. For directions and additional information, please visit http://clarklibrary.ucla.edu/visit/

ENROLLMENT BY INSTRUCTOR CONSENT ONLY (see below for application instructions)

On successful completion, students receive a $1,000 scholarship, funded by the Ahmanson Foundation and administered through the Center for 17th- & 18th-Century Studies.

Overview of the topic

The eighteenth century was the first great age of print, the age that invented the professional author, and above all the age of satire. This course focuses on three satirists who were bound by both friendship and enmity: Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu.  We will pay particular attention to the way that the first two of these authors defined themselves and their authorial personae through their careful manipulation of print, while the third, bound by social convention and liberated by aristocratic privilege, worked largely anonymously to equally fascinating effect. The original forms in which the works of these authors appeared, and the vast catalog of personal pamphlet attacks and caricatures that appeared in response to their writings, will provide the framework with which we read some of the most witty, vicious, and visceral literature in English.

The seminar is open to upper-division students from any UCLA department; no special technical knowledge is required. Interested students should send an e-mail to Professor Deutsch (hdeutsch@humnet.ucla.edu) with the following information, by Monday, November 13, 2017.

  • your name, major, and year
  • a list of any courses you have taken that prepare you in some way for this seminar, either in subject matter (early modern and/or eighteenth-century history and literature, history of the book) or in research methods (any course with a research paper)
  • A clear statement of what interests you about this course, and what you hope to get out of it.

The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed with the Sun, William Blake, c.1805

English 181B: Radicalism and Dissent: Protestantism and English Literature, 1640 to 1799
Directed by Professor Robert Maniquis, UCLA Department of English
Spring Quarter 2018, Thursdays 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Held at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library (off campus)
The Clark Library is located 12 miles from campus in the West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles. For directions and additional information, please visit http://clarklibrary.ucla.edu/visit/

ENROLLMENT BY INSTRUCTOR CONSENT ONLY (see below for application instructions)

On successful completion, students receive a $1,000 scholarship, funded by the Ahmanson Foundation and administered through the Center for 17th- & 18th-Century Studies.

Overview of the topic

The seminar will involve reading of such authors as Calvin, Milton, Defoe, Watts, Wesley, Priestley, Blake, and Hazlitt. The rich book and pamphlet collections of the Clark Library will also be explored in preparing seminar presentations on explosive theological issues in politics from the 17th to the 19th centuries. Predestination, grace, faith and works, baptism, original sin, church governance, the filth or the glory of the body, female liberation, economic empire, racism, and many more such topics dominate most discourse in Great Britain and America during these centuries. Some of these topics are as old as Christianity itself, but they burst into the seventeenth century in new ways. Everything, of course, is affected by the Protestant Reformation: metaphysical ideas, spiritual attitudes, vocabulary, style, prose formulas, dispositions toward the symbolic and the allegorical, indeed, the assumed purpose of metaphor itself. In reading both literary texts and theological polemics, students will consider, in great detail, the history and continued presence of English and American Protestantism in religion, politics, and popular imagination.

This seminar is open to upper-division students from any UCLA department; for permission to enroll, email Professor Maniquis (77delights@gmail.com) with the following information by Friday, February 16, 2018:

  • Your name, major and year, and a list of any courses you have taken that prepare you in some way for this seminar, either in subject matter (early modern and/or eighteenth-century history and literature, religion, history of the book, philosophy, etc.) or in research methods.
  • A clear statement of what interests you about this course, and its relation to your overall course of studies.

You will be invited to a personal interview.


Enrollment in each Ahmanson Undergraduate Seminar is limited to ten participants. Those who successfully complete the course requirements receive an award of $1,000.

Questions about the program:
Center for 17th- & 18th-Century Studies
310-206-8552
302 Royce Hall, UCLA